(Source: travalicious)

bowbot:

hey. did i mention i love neil cicierega

busket:

image

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curtdogg:

Charles Martinet just joined Vine, and it’s already the best thing.

rate-my-reptile:

whatthefauna:

Chameleon eyes are mounted on conical towers and can move independently from one another. When focusing on prey, a chameleon will switch to binocular vision and focus both eyes on its target, presumably to enhance depth perception before striking with its long, sticky tongue.
Image credit: Scott Cromwell

STICK STICK ORBITALLWAY (cones aggressively toward u while chanting & dubstupping) 9.8/10

rate-my-reptile:

whatthefauna:

Chameleon eyes are mounted on conical towers and can move independently from one another. When focusing on prey, a chameleon will switch to binocular vision and focus both eyes on its target, presumably to enhance depth perception before striking with its long, sticky tongue.

Image credit: Scott Cromwell

STICK STICK ORBITALLWAY (cones aggressively toward u while chanting & dubstupping) 9.8/10

(Source: pyr4mi-ds)

fabulazerstokill:

harrysde:

From Elon James White Tuesday night.

This better have hundreds of thousands of notes at the end of the day or else

neilcicierega:

80s Computers: TERRIFYING CUBES EMERGING FROM THE VOID OF SPACE. ENTER THE GRIDZONE.

90s Computers: Beige home appliances for the whole family. Put one in your study.

I like to dig through images from old computer ads and magazines. One odd observation I always make is how drastically they changed in just a couple years.

PC sales grew throughout the 80s as tools for offices and hobbyists. But come the 1990s, corporations noticed that growth was slowing down. So around that point they largely ditched the spooky sci-fi inspired imagery and starting doing what Apple had been doing for years: portraying PCs as warm & approachable, with a return to simplistic, Helmut Krone inspired advertising. The idea of the PC as a home necessity was solidified when Web and e-mail exploded in the mid-90s.
And it had good run. We’re in the “one phone and laptop per family member” phase now, and it doesn’t really need to be advertised anymore because it’s part of culture itself.